Update to minimum bid rates and nearly 100 new loans. Weekly Lending Review: week 46

Week 46: 11 – 17 November 2013

It was the best week ever for the number and value of lending opportunities available to you: 98 business loans totalling £5.5 million were listed on the marketplace. The majority of loan applications came from London and the South East, and the most common loan purpose was for expansion and growth capital.

New loans

There were 98 new business loans listed last week and there are currently 60 auctions on the marketplace.

The total value of the new listed loans was £5,492,500; that’s an average of £56,046 per loan. The largest loan value was £160,000 and the smallest loan value was £5,000.

Business loans still available for bidding on for the next 3 days or more:

Weekly marketplace trends

These graphs show the most recent activity on the marketplace. The average gross yield graph is reported weekly and shows a rolling two week average. Number of loans, value of loans and secondary market are reported weekly. The dates on the graph should be read as ‘week beginning’, for example: 11-Nov represents the week of 11th- 17th November.

Weekly average gross yield (2 weeks rolling)

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Number of listed loans per week

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Listed loan value per week

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Update to minimum bid rates

We review the minimum bid rates in the middle of every month to decide whether they should be changed or kept the same. This month, the decision has been made to increase rates by 0.1% on the A, B and C risk bands. The new rates will come into effect for loan requests listed after 9am on Monday 2nd December. The new rates are as follows:

A+: 6% (no change)

A: 7.6% (+0.1%)

B: 8.6% (+ 0.1%)

C: 9.6% (+ 0.1%)

C-: 11.5% (no change)

News you should know

We updated our terms and conditions last week, to give us more flexibility when dealing with loans that are behind with their repayments.

Lakeland Picnic borrowed through the marketplace in September and we visited them in the Lake District where they make their delicious homemade burgers. We put together a picture story of their business story including a special message to the people who lent them money.

Community Discussions

This week we’re talking about tax on interest earned. You can join the discussion on our community forum.

Loans defaulted last week

Software development company. Loan 127

This Loughborough business has been trading since 2008 but failed to keep up with repayments and is now in liquidation. The original loan amount was £35,000 and all 319 investors have been notified.

Enjoy lending, The Funding Circle Team

 

Welcoming Luke Jooste to Funding Circle

As we’ve alluded to recently, it’s going to be a big twelve months at Funding Circle.

You may have read recently that Funding Circle raised $37million in October to invest partly in launching our US operation, but also to invest in expanding our UK offering into key opportunity areas, focussing mainly on expanding the types of loans we offer to our UK investors.

One such area is property finance and to help us define our offering, we are very pleased to welcome Luke Jooste to the team. Luke is a property finance specialist, bringing fifteen years of experience with him, and we’re really excited to have someone of his stature onboard with us.

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Before joining Funding Circle, Luke oversaw the commercial performance of Barclays Business as their Commercial Director, of which property is a major asset component.

We spent a few minutes with Luke to hear what drew him to Funding Circle.

What’s your background?

I’m always reluctant to say (only because it shows my age), but I’ve been in financial services for 18 years, 15 of which have been in property finance. I began my banking career in 1995 after being recruited from University by one of the large South African retail banks.

I moved over to the UK as an Associate Credit Director (Real Estate) with Barclays Corporate Bank in 2008, just as the credit crunch really took hold. It was an incredible learning experience for me as I got a huge amount of insight into the heart of credit risk in the UK real estate sector. After two years in that role I moved to Barclays Business Bank as UK Head of Real Estate Finance, and for the past 12 months I’ve been the Commercial Director of Barclays Business.

It’s been a difficult time for the UK banking sector but very valuable experience for me to have.  I’m now looking to bring that experience across to Funding Circle, so that we maximise opportunities while avoiding the mistakes of the past, and add real value for our borrowers and investors.

Why did Funding Circle appeal to you?

The emergence of peer-to-peer lending is probably the most exciting development in the UK financial sector at the moment. So being given the opportunity to develop a real estate finance proposition for the company that is pioneering the peer-to-peer lending movement is both an honour and a compliment for me.

It’s also incredibly exciting to move from a global corporate like Barclays to a smaller tech start-up company. I’m still struggling with not wearing a suit everyday and getting used to having table tennis in the office however! But most importantly it’s about the people. The team at Funding Circle are exceptionally talented and that was the most appealing aspect.

Why do you think it’s a good idea for Funding Circle to develop it’s property offer?

If Funding Circle is going to achieve its ambition of being a global peer-to-peer lending company, then it needs a full suite of funding product offerings. Property finance is at the core of any funding market. There is general consensus across the board that the UK real estate market is improving, and we must be able to service borrowers who need finance as well as investors that are looking to get into this popular asset class.

But we won’t be naive about how we do that and are very aware of the risks that this carries, particularly given the learnings from the 2008 property downturn. Just because it will be difficult however, doesn’t mean we shouldn’t do it.  In fact it means we should do it a lot better. As a peer-to-peer lender, Funding Circle doesn’t have the legacy in real estate finance that the banks do. I think this gives us a real advantage and look forward to enhancing lending opportunities for all of our investors.

Why now?

The timing is a combination of the natural growth path of Funding Circle, a recovering property market (based on a number of metrics, not just house prices), the continued shortage of credit in the market (especially to small and medium sized property professionals) and ultimately our sheer determination to be able to offer the right suite of products and opportunities to our borrowers and investors.

Thanks Luke.  That’s it for now, but we’ll be in touch with more exciting property news in the next few weeks.

News

Picture story: tasty homemade burgers brought to you straight from the Lake District

Michelle Partington has been running Lakeland Picnic since 2007, making homemade burgers and sausages from their base in the Lake District. The business was looking to raise finance so they could revamp the look of their street stalls.

In September, Lakeland Picnic took out a business loan through Funding Circle which was funded by 221 people across the UK, alongside the UK Government.

We went up to visit Michelle in the Lake District to see how her and the team create their magical meat and then followed her to their stall in Manchester’s Piccadilly Gardens, where she had some lovely words to say about everyone who had lent them money.

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If you’d like to find out more about applying for a business loan through Funding Circle, visit our business page which will give you all of the information you need.

You can view our other case studies here.

Updates to the Terms & Conditions

Today we will be making some changes to the Terms & Conditions which will affect all of our community.

As you may already know, we will be launching new borrowing products in the near future, such as asset and property finance, as well as opening more channels through which you can lend your money – the iOS mobile app for example. Through the introduction of these new products, there will be many more lending opportunities and specifically more lending opportunities on larger loans, so we have made some changes to the terms and conditions to reflect these new types of loans.

In addition, we want to ensure that we are in a more flexible position to deal with borrowers who are unable to keep up with their monthly repayments. These changes should help us reach a better outcome for both investors and businesses.

Here are the key changes you should know about:

1. Information from borrowers: We have added requirements for borrowers to provide information to us if we request it, during the life of the loan.

2. Restructuring loans: In certain circumstances we’ll be able to agree an extension of the loan term with borrowers (provided there is an increase in the interest rate), which may help borrowers stay in business whilst making regular repayments back to investors, rather than placing the loan into default.

3. Flexibility of default date: If there is one late payment for a loan, we may place the loan into default (after 10 working days) if we believe this will maximise recovery.

4. Restrictions on loan participation: A single investor (either retail or institutional) can fund up to a maximum of 20% of each loan through the API.

5. Our ‘website’ is now our ‘platform’: To better describe our service due to the apps we will release in the future.

These changes will be reflected in the updated Loan Conditions, as well as the Terms & Conditions for investors, borrowers and intermediaries. It’s important to have a look, as by continuing to use the Funding Circle marketplace you agree to be bound by these revised terms. From later today, before making a bid you’ll also be asked to reaccept the Loan Conditions.

 

Meet the Funding Circle team. Weekly Lending Review: week 45

Week 45: 4 – 10 November 2013

We had our biggest week for fully submitted applications from businesses which will result in many more lending opportunities in the weeks to come. £3.5 million was lent to businesses last week and a further 71 business in the UK were looking for funding. The majority of businesses were located in the South East; 36 were looking for expansion funds and 31 needed working capital.

New loans

There were 71 new business loans listed last week and there are currently 46 auctions on the marketplace.

The total value of the new listed loans was £3,654,020; that’s an average of £51,465 per loan. The largest loan value was £150,000 and the smallest loan value was £10,000.

Business loans still available for bidding on for the next 3 days or more:

Weekly marketplace trends

These graphs show the most recent activity on the marketplace. The average gross yield graph is reported weekly and shows a rolling two week average. Number of loans, value of loans and secondary market are reported weekly. The dates on the graph should be read as ‘week beginning’, for example: 4-Nov represents the week of 4th- 10th November.

Weekly average gross yield (2 weeks rolling)

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Number of listed loans per week

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Listed loan value per week

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News you should know

Following from our first team interview where we met the customer relations team, we have also spent 5 minutes with the insolvency team, headed up by Andrew. You can read about their backgrounds, what they do outside of Funding Circle and what they consider to be the highs and lows of their job.

Community Discussions

This week we’re talking about how your account statements could be improved. You can join the discussion on our community forum.

Loans defaulted last week

No loans were defaulted.

Enjoy lending, The Funding Circle Team

 

Weekly Lending Review: Week 44

Your 5 minutes with… the Insolvency Team

Following our first team interview where we spoke to Jenah and the rest of the Customer Relations team, we thought we’d spend 5 minutes with Andrew and Susie, who work on the insolvencies and recoveries of Funding Circle businesses.

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A small proportion of businesses will be unable to maintain repayments on their loans and become insolvent so we thought it was important for you to meet some of the people who are dealing with these cases on your behalf.

Andrew is Head of Insolvency and Susie is our Insolvency Administrator. We are growing this team and expect a further two members to join them by the end of the year. Andrew started in the summer and Susie has been with us since November last year.

Day to day activities include:

Checking in on businesses that have fallen behind with repayments, working with borrowers and guarantors to establish a fair payment plan (if required) that protects the interests of investors, notifying investors of the status of late payments, ensuring that agreements with borrowers are in line with our internal policies (which may change from time to time), developing policies and using technology to optimise our activities.

What is your background?

Andrew: I’ve been a qualified solicitor for 9 years now. Initially I studied biology at Oxford, and then took conversion exams to become a solicitor. In my early legal career I worked for a charity, the Government, and the NHS and then in corporate restructuring. As the recession hit, I moved from solvent reorganisations to insolvent reorganisations, Blockbusters and Halliwells to name two.

Susie: I have a completely different background to Andrew, I actually came from a travel agency in London, where I was in customer relations and also worked as their internal auditor.

So why did Funding Circle appeal to you?

Susie: When I joined, there were half the number of people and probably half the number of businesses, but I could see Funding Circle was expanding rapidly so the opportunity for development was there. The company has also been very accommodating to flexible working, so that’s helped a lot.

Andrew: Funding Circle is an incredibly exciting and innovative business. My role at Funding Circle is also quite different to what I have done in the past. Previously, I was a solicitor with clients and now I am business manager with legal knowledge, which can be very helpful. When I instruct lawyers and insolvency practitioners, I know what they’re doing and I also know what to expect.

Why is what you do important for our customers?

Andrew: It’s important for investors to know that we work very hard to maximise recoveries for them, whilst also trying to be fair to businesses and to give them a chance to get back on their feet. We look at the same factors in every case and have the same requirements from businesses, the main requirements being transparency and regular communication. However, every case is unique. From a borrower’s perspective, it’s important for them to know that they are dealing with fair and reasonable individuals who want to work with them to get the best result for all.

Susie: Yes exactly, and each case is different. You’re working for the benefit of both investors and businesses. Whilst we want to secure the maximum recovery for investors, we also want to show empathy towards the borrowers and make the right decision for all parties involved.

There is risk with lending and inevitably a small proportion of businesses will struggle to keep up with their repayments, but what do you consider to be the best outcome if this happens?

Susie: It’s a good result when we have achieved a recovery that works for both parties; the investors get their money back and it is affordable for the borrower.

Andrew: The best outcome is 100% recovery and a surviving business! But other than that, a good outcome will only come from great communication with the borrower. When there’s two-way communication, you can really understand their position which gives us flexibility to find an affordable solution that meets everyone’s needs. Ideally this will also help the individuals carry on running their business, having come out of the financial difficulty they previously saw themselves in.

And what is your favourite thing about working at Funding Circle?

Susie: The buzz in the office; everybody is busy and it’s a great environment to work in. It gets you out of bed in the morning!

Andrew: The way that everyone is committed to not only making their own teams the leaders in their field, but that everyone shares the vision of where this business is going. It is very impressive and not something I’ve come across before in my working life.

And what is the most difficult part of your job?

Andrew: Leaving in the evening!  Seriously though, sometimes we have to make very difficult decisions and it’s not easy when you think about the impact those decisions might have on people. Leaving those decisions in the office when I go home is the most difficult part of my job, but fortunately my wife is a good listener.

Susie: Speaking to business owners who have tried everything to turn their business around but are still unable to find the money to meet their repayments.

Yes, that definitely must be tough. On a lighter note, can you tell us an interesting fact about yourself?

Andrew: I was bitten by a seal in the Galapagos Islands. I’d been snorkelling and as I got back into the boat, a seal bit my knee. It didn’t hurt at all, it was a friendly nip!

Susie: As we’re talking about animals, I was stung by a hornet when I was younger and remains as one of my most vivid memories. The hornet was huge!

Ouch! That sounds nasty. And aside from run-ins with various mammals and insects, what other interests do you have?

Susie: I enjoy socialising with my friends, without my kids! I also enjoy running as it gives me time to process my thoughts.

Andrew: Illegal raves in Vauxhall… I wish.  I’m quite boring really – I like cooking, reading and hanging out with my wife and two daughters.

From the Galapagos to Vauxhall, very interesting! We’ll finish on this one, do you have a favourite city?

Susie: London, without a doubt. You’re going to say something abstract aren’t you Andrew?

Andrew: St Petersburg! The Hermitage in St Petersburg is awesome, and they have a mini version of St Basil’s Cathedral down a little alleyway, which is very atmospheric.

 

£12.5 million lent to businesses in October. Weekly Lending Review: week 44

Week 44: 28 October – 3 November 2013

Over £3 million was lent to businesses across the UK last week, contributing to a total of £12.5 million for the whole of October. New businesses looking for funding included a retailer of prescription glasses and Coventry-based fruit & vegetable retailer. The majority of businesses were in the retail sector and the most common reason for needing finance was to help them expand.

New loans

There were 62 new business loans listed last week and there are currently 44 auctions on the marketplace.

The total value of the new listed loans was £3,184,500; that’s an average of £51,363 per loan. The largest loan value was £150,000 and the smallest loan value was £6,500.

Business loans still available for bidding on for the next 3 days or more:

Weekly marketplace trends

These graphs show the most recent activity on the marketplace. The average gross yield graph is reported weekly and shows a rolling two week average. Number of loans, value of loans and secondary market are reported weekly. The dates on the graph should be read as ‘week beginning’, for example: 28-Oct represents the week of 28th October – 3rd November.

Weekly average gross yield (2 weeks rolling)

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Number of listed loans per week

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Listed loan value per week

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News you should know

Our roundup of October’s peer-to-peer lending industry news is up on our blog; including details of regulation and the launch of Funding Circle in the USA.

Community Discussions

This week we’re talking about the size of loan parts selling on the secondary market. You can join the discussion on our community forum.

Loans defaulted last week

Decoration specialists from Grimsby. Loan 468

The business has been trading since 1995 and has failed to keep up with repayments. The original loan amount was £50,000 and all 330 investors have been notified.

Diamond jewellers. Loan 2100

This business is based in Gateshead and the director has not been able to make repayments. The original loan amount was £21,000 and all 267 investors have been notified.

Enjoy lending, The Funding Circle Team

 

A big month for peer-to-peer lending: October industry news

October has been a bumper month for media coverage of the peer-to-peer lending industry. What with the Financial Conduct Authority announcing plans to regulate the industry from April 2014, and our move into the US, peer-to-peer lending has been across the papers, radio and even TV. Martin Lewis has also been blowing the industry’s trumpet after revealing the great returns he has made by investing in three of the UK’s biggest peer-to-peer lenders.

Let’s regulate

Peer-to-peers are good for banking competition

It’s great to see the Daily Telegraph welcoming news of peer-to-peer regulation.  We certainly agree that “it’s unusual to hear senior executives pining for increased regulatory control”, but that really is how we and the Peer-to-Peer Finance Association feel.  Proportionate regulation will ensure the industry is cemented in the wider financial services industry.

Peer-to-peer lending has a role to play but investing matchmakers need tough controls

Jeff Prestridge at the Mail on Sunday highlights how the regulatory emphasis will be on ensuring those prepared to lend via peer-to-peer platforms are not misled in any way, shape or form.  He says all of the risks will have to be spelt out in black and white, and any interest rate calculations will have to be fair and clear.  Quite right too, and you’ll be pleased to know transparency has always been the name of our game.

FCA wrong to lump P2P lending and crowdfunding together

Christine Farnish, chair of the Peer-to-Peer Finance Association, wrote an interesting piece for Money Marketing encouraging the FCA to better distinguish between peer-to-peer lending and crowdfunding.  She argues that businesses taking a peer-to-peer loan go through a full credit check, similar to a traditional bank loan, therefore making it lower risk than crowdfunding, where some investors might see total capital loss.

Funding Circle raises $37M and heads across the pond

Funding Circle US will ‘cut out banks’

On 24 October we announced that we had raised $37 million and were joining forces with San Francisco-based business lender Endurance Lending Network (now known as Funding Circle) to help millions of businesses across America sidestep the broken banking system and access finance.  Our very own Samir Desai kicked the day off in style on the BBC Radio 4’s Today programme – take a listen. Other highlights include Reuters, Daily Telegraph, New York Times and Forbes.

Funding Circle Raises $37 Million and Launches in The U.S.

The go-to site for peer-to-peer lending news in the US, Lend Academy, also covered the news.  Peter Renton wrote he first met with Samir back in November 2012 when they discussed the US market generally.  At the time he said the peer-to-business market in the US was wide open with no established player, but in Peter’s own words: “that officially ends today with the launch of Funding Circle USA.” Thanks Peter! We’ll certainly be working very hard to help make sure that’s the case.

Martin Lewis reveals all

What I earned from peer-to-peer savings

Having invested money in three of the biggest peer-to-peer lenders in the UK, Martin revealed the various returns on his money and personal highlights of investing in each platform.  He also reminds potential investors how important it is to diversify something we believe in at Funding Circle as well.

Martin was also on BBC Radio 2 earlier this week explaining to presenter Vanessa Feltz how it all works, and how investors can make a much better return on their money.

Lending to small businesses: banks vs. peer-to-peer

Non-bank lending to small businesses at highest level since 2008

The Financial Times reported that non-bank lending to small businesses has hit a five-year high.  The UK’s commercial finance brokers have arranged £10.5bn of credit for small and medium-sized enterprises in the last year. This marks the highest figure since 2008 and an annual rise of 17 per cent.  Andrew Bounds argues that the data highlights the shift away from traditional bank lending to small business, which has shrunk by a quarter since 2011.

Net lending to businesses continues to contract

Mortgage Introducer picks up on similar news that high street banking figures from the British Bankers’ Association show that net lending to businesses has fallen in 8 of the last 12 months, despite growth of £2.5bn between August and September.  Adam Tyler, CEO of the National Association of Commercial Finance Brokers commented: “High-street lenders remain very selective in granting finance which is stifling small businesses and slamming the brakes on economic growth, particularly jobs and wages”.

 

3 ideas to help your business grow

We’re committed to helping British businesses grow so we’ve asked one of our great business owners for her ideas on how to run one successfully. We visited Michelle Partington, of Lakeland Picnic in the Lake District and captured her thoughts in this video.

Michelle setup Lakeland Picnic in 2007 as she wanted to make and sell delicious hot food at events and shows in the North West. The team manufactures burgers and sausages at Holme Mills farm in the Lake District and sells them at street stalls across the country.

Her 3 tips are:

Tip 1: Support your team in their strengths and encourage learning.

Tip 2: Have a network of people who you can rely on for advice.

Tip 3: Don’t just plan it. Go fot it!

Watch the video for more detail on each tip.

Lakeland Picnic borrowed £17,500 in September from 221 people through Funding Circle to update their street stalls. If you’re looking for business finance, find out how your business loan could be funded by people across the UK in a matter of days.

Government participation in loans reducing to 10%

In March, the Government started lending to businesses through Funding Circle and until now, they have funded 20% of every loan that has appeared on the marketplace. From Friday 1st November, this figure will decrease to 10% of every loan.

Since they started lending through Funding Circle, they have lent more than £15 million to 1,100 businesses and played a big role in helping us to raise awareness and understanding of what we do.

We are hopeful that the Government will consider continuing to lend to businesses once they have lent out their £20 million allocation and we will keep you updated with any progress on this.

Our aim is to facilitate hundreds of millions of pounds of loans to British businesses every month in the next few years, and to do this we will require more sources of money from a variety of organisations. In November we are likely to see some of these new sources of finance start lending following the reduction in the percentage of Government funds. We will provide further information on this as timings become clearer.

People lending directly to businesses through Funding Circle have always been the core of what we are about and we will ensure this continues as we keep growing.

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8 simple tips to make your restaurant more mobile friendly

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The restaurant industry is one of the most competitive industries in the world and it’s worth over £40 billion in the UK alone. We have restaurants ranging from top-end fine dining to ‘take away’ outlets and with new places to eat opening every week across the country, it’s never been as important to get your restaurant visible on the web and more specifically, the mobile web, to aid potential customers on the move find your establishment.

Being visible on mobile is important for most businesses today but it may be even more true for restaurants and other local businesses. The reason is simple: more searches are being made on mobile than ever before for local businesses. Smart phones are able to correlate key searches such as ‘pizza’ with local data based on the location reported on the users’ smartphone. That means people are in your neighbourhood searching for a restaurant like yours, ready to spend money. All you have to make sure of is that they can find you. Here are some ideas to help you with this:

1. Your location matters! So add your restaurant to Google+ local

A massive 43% of all Google searches are local or location based, which increases to 50% for people searching on their mobiles. Makes sense doesn’t it? If you’re on the move and want a bite to eat, you’ll probably use your phone to search for a restaurant. Google will link a customer’s search to their location, making your local Google+ page priceless. The key thing to remember here is to always keep your information up to date: fill out your hours, contact information and the category that applies to your business (eg restaurant). So when searching for Harrys Bar Pizzeria in the example below, I can see exactly where it is, I can go to the website and I can call them. Easy.

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2. Make sure your menu is easy to find

A report by Gourmet Marketing suggests that the menu is the most important factor for people when making their dining decision, so you should ensure you’ve placed your menu in an easy-to-see place on your website. Even though the website in the example below is not mobile optimized, their menu tab is easy to find and easy to click on.

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3. Why is your menu on a PDF?

Mobile users are impatient and usually have unreliable connectivity so it is up to you to make your information as easily available to them as possible. So why do you put your menu on a PDF? Mobile users don’t have time to download a PDF, they want to see the menu right now! This also goes for putting your address details in an image. People want to be able to copy / paste your address into Google Maps so they can find you! The cartoonist, The Oatmeal sums this up beautifully.

4. Your menu passes the test so now you need some reviews

Review sites: you either love them or hate them but it’s impossible to hide from them. You’d be missing a trick if you didn’t take the front foot and sign up to at least one. When searching for restaurants in a local area, you’ll more often than not find review sites coming top of the results.

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Take TripAdvisor for example, it has over 2 million restaurants worldwide on their books and has over 2 million visitors per month. They released a report with Strategy One suggesting that 93% of people were influenced by reviews before they make a booking. The Search Engine Journal has some good tips on how to make the most of your TripAdvisor listing.

5. Clickable phone numbers so customers can book easily

You’ve grabbed the attention of your customer, they like the look of your menu and your reviews are pretty good too, so now they need to call you to make a booking. Make it easy for them!

Nothing is more annoying than finding a restaurant on the web and having to grab a pen to scribble down the number. As with everything these days, user experience is very important. Web designers Powederkeg have written a blog post on how to make your phone number clickable. It shouldn’t be too hard to implement and won’t cost you much either.

6. Encourage customers to use photography to share their experience

Food photography is becoming part of modern restaurant culture so why not encourage people to use their mobiles to take photos when they’re in your restaurant and share them on social networks, such as Instagram and Pinterest, to build up your brand. Make sure you create an account on these networks too, so people can follow you and accredit their picture to your establishment. The Huffington Post has compiled a list of their top 10 Instagram restaurant pictures which should give you some inspiration!

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7. Streamline your payment process and move to mobile

Accepting all major credit cards is something that customers expect, but there are more ways for customers to pay and from next year they’ll be able to pay for their meal using their mobile phone. Keep your eyes out for the Zapp, who have entered into a partnership with payments firm Worldpay.

8. Service, service, service

It used to be that when people didn’t like your service, they told 5 friends. Now they tell 500 followers on Twitter. In today’s connected world, you cannot afford to provide a bad customer experience at your restaurant so once you’ve got people through the door, delight them so that they will tell people about it online and on review sites which will help bring more people through the door. Good luck!

Funding Circle in the US & a record week for lending opportunities. Weekly Lending Review: week 43

Week 43: 21 – 27 October 2013

Last week was a very busy one for the Funding Circle community: we announced the launch of our operations in the US and we also listed a record 77 businesses for you to lend to. New lending opportunities included a competitive swimwear retailer and a 5 star B&B near Keswick.

New loans

There were 77 new business loans listed last week and there are currently 56 auctions on the marketplace.

The total value of the new listed loans was £4,418,520; that’s an average of £57,383 per loan. The largest loan value was £200,000 and the smallest loan value was £14,000.

Business loans still available for bidding on for the next 3 days or more:

Weekly marketplace trends

These graphs show the most recent activity on the marketplace. The average gross yield graph is reported weekly and shows a rolling two week average. Number of loans, value of loans and secondary market are reported weekly. The dates on the graph should be read as ‘week beginning’, for example: 21-Oct represents the week of 21st – 27th October.

Weekly average gross yield (2 weeks rolling)

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Number of listed loans per week

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Listed loan value per week

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News you should know

We announced the completion of a $37 million equity round, which will be used to further our UK business and launch operations in the US to help many more millions of businesses with access to finance.

We visited one of our great businesses in the run-up to Halloween to see what goodies they had on offer. You can watch our short video which tells the story of how business owner Oliver grew Sensible Supplies from his garage to a 10,000 square foot warehouse in Nottinghamshire.

Community Discussions

This week we’re talking about Government’s funding proportion dropping from 20% of each business loan to 10%. You can join the discussion on our community forum.

Loans defaulted last week

No loans were defaulted.

Enjoy lending, The Funding Circle Team

Weekly Lending Review: week 42

Picture story: peer-to-peer lending helped this traditional British fashion brand to expand

389 people helped a leather accessories manufacturer move premises

Peer-to-peer lending helped a quintessentially British fashion brand move premises to cope with increased demand for their products.

Owen Barry designs and manufactures clothing and accessories from the finest ethically sourced sheepskins and leathers from Britain and Europe. They were looking to raise finance so they could move to a larger premises to cope with increasing demand from overseas retailers.

In May 2012, they took out a business loan through Funding Circle which was entirely funded by 389 people across the UK.

We visited the team down in Street, Somerset and spoke to Cindi Barnstable whose family has been running Owen Barry since it started in 1948. Here’s the story of her business and her experience of Funding Circle in Cindi’s own words:

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You can view our other case studies here.

Funding Circle raises $37m in equity funding to expand UK operations and launch in the US

Today we’re excited to announce that we have completed a $37 million series C investment, led by Facebook backers Accel Partners.

This is one of the largest investment rounds made in Europe this year, showing how far Funding Circle has come in the past 3 years. In the last 12 months alone more than 1,800 businesses have accessed a total of £110 million from over 20,000 investors. The funds will be used to expand in the UK and launch in the US.

In the UK, the funds will be used to improve our service and introduce a range of new borrowing products for businesses, such as commercial property and asset finance. These will significantly increase the number of lending opportunities for investors.

Our vision is to give businesses a better way to borrow and investors a better way to earn a return. Since our launch in the UK, we have developed technology to allow businesses to borrow in a faster and more efficient way whilst allowing investors to make a better return on their money. We’re now excited to be taking this technology to the US.

We are joining forces with Endurance Lending Network to help millions of businesses across the US access finance. Endurance will now operate under the Funding Circle brand and their team will be based in San Francisco. Together as one business we combine their local knowledge and talent with our experience and innovative technology. The US business will operate separately from Funding Circle in the UK, so there will be no change to your lending experiences.

Today’s news is the beginning of an exciting 12 months at Funding Circle. You will soon see improvements and new functions appearing across the site and we’ll also be launching our mobile bidding app very soon.

We are talking about today’s news on our forum, so please do join the conversation.

The Funding Circle team

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Costumes, sweets, decorations and more: our sneak peek into a Funding Circle business

Last month, Sensible Supplies borrowed £50k from 542 people across the UK and with the party season about to kick off, we thought we’d take a look around their warehouse to see what they have on offer for Halloween. We weren’t disappointed as they stock over 700 different Halloween costumes for you to choose from, for all of the family!

If you’re thinking of having any type of party this season, it’s more than likely that Sensible Supplies will have everything you need to help you host the perfect evening for your friends and family. The warehouse, based just outside of Nottingham, really is an Aladdin’s cave full of goodies including balloons, sweets, decorations, candles, toys and packaging.

Their Funding Circle loan details

Sensible Supplies was established in 2008 by Oliver Charles-Richards. In September he borrowed £50k from 542 people through Funding Circle to buy stock for a venture with Groupon, a website offering deals and discounts. The business has experienced huge growth over the past 3 years; Oliver started selling products from his garage and now operates out of a 10,000 square foot warehouse in Hucknall, Nottinghamshire. The business needed a loan to purchase a large order of sweets to complete a deal with Groupon; so we all know where to go to buy sweets for Trick-or-Treaters this year!

In this video you’ll hear how Oliver started his business and made it into what it is today, as well as sharing his experience of Funding Circle.

You can take a look at our other case study videos on our blog.

Funding Circle helping more businesses than ever. Weekly Lending Review: week 42

Week 42: 14 – 20 October 2013

Last week, the majority of businesses who were looking for funding were either in the retail or manufacturing sector and most businesses were located in the South-East. Of the 48 new loans, 19 were allocated to the C risk band.

New loans

There were 48 new business loans listed last week and there are currently 28 auctions on the marketplace.

The total value of the new listed loans was £2,605,500 that’s an average of £54,281 per loan. The largest loan value was £150,000 and the smallest loan value was £10,000.

Business loans still available for bidding on for the next 3 days or more:

Weekly marketplace trends

These graphs show the most recent activity on the marketplace. The average gross yield graph is reported weekly and shows a rolling two week average. Number of loans, value of loans and secondary market are reported weekly. The dates on the graph should be read as ‘week beginning’, for example: 14-Oct represents the week of 14th – 20th October.

Weekly average gross yield (2 weeks rolling)

yield

Number of listed loans per week

number

Listed loan value per week

value

News you should know

Figures released by the Bank of England last week showed net lending to businesses of all sizes dropped in the last quarter by £2.3 billion. In the same period, Funding Circle investors have helped 530 businesses; an increase of 30%.

Community Discussions

This week we’re providing suggestions for the summary page. You can join the discussion on our community forum.

Loans defaulted last week

No loans were defaulted.

Enjoy lending, The Funding Circle Team

 Weekly Lending Review: week 41

Bank lending to small businesses down again, but our figures show 30% growth for last quarter

Bank lending to small and medium businesses fell in the three months to August, according to figures published by the Bank of England today.  The Trends in Lending report showed that net lending to businesses of all sizes fell by £2.3bn.

Despite this drop  – that few will be surprised of – lending through Funding Circle has continued to accelerate. Lending increased by 30% in the last quarter with more than 570 businesses borrowing from Funding Circle investors. Compared to 12 months ago this figure is an increase of 170%.

As the economy continues to show positive signs, we’re looking forward to helping even more businesses access finance throughout this year and into 2014.

 

Update to minimum bid rates and a record-breaking week. Weekly Lending Review: week 41

Week 41: 7 – 13 October 2013

Last week was a record-breaking week for both the number and value of business loans listed on the marketplace, available for you to lend to. Of the 68 new loans worth £4.6 million, the majority were in the manufacturing industry and working capital was the most common reason for needing finance.

New loans

There were 68 new business loans listed last week and there are currently 44 auctions on the marketplace.

The total value of the new listed loans was £4,593,500; that’s an average of £67,551 per loan. The largest loan value was £150,000 and the smallest loan value was £15,000.

Business loans still available for bidding on for the next 3 days or more:

Weekly marketplace trends

These graphs show the most recent activity on the marketplace. The average gross yield graph is reported weekly and shows a rolling two week average. Number of loans, value of loans and secondary market are reported weekly. The dates on the graph should be read as ‘week beginning’, for example: 30-Sep represents the week of 7th – 13th October.

Weekly average gross yield (2 weeks rolling)

yield

Number of listed loans per week

number

Listed loan value per week

value

Update to minimum bid rates

We review the minimum bid rates in the middle of every month to decide whether they should be changed or kept the same. This month, the decision has been made to increase rates by 0.2% on the A, B and C risk bands. The new rates will come into effect for loan requests listed after 9am on Friday 1st November. The new rates are as follows:

A+: 6% (no change)

A: 7.5% (+0.2%)

B: 8.5% (+ 0.2%)

C: 9.5% (+ 0.2%)

C-: 11.5% (no change)

News you should know

A family-run gin manufacturer from Bristol took out a loan earlier this year so they could buy a new gin still. They manufacture gin and fruit liqueurs and you can read about how their gin makes it to the shelves of Waitrose in this picture story.

Community Discussions

This week we’re talking about peer-to-peer regulation and you can join the discussion on our community forum.

Loans defaulted last week

No loans were defaulted.

Enjoy lending, The Funding Circle Team

Weekly lending Review: Week 40

The Complete Guide to Growing Your Business Internationally. Part 3: Staffing Your Overseas Business

Part 3 of Growing Your Business Internationally: Staffing Your Overseas Business

Welcome to part three of our guide to growing your business internationally. In this edition, we’ll discuss the options you’ll face when staffing your overseas venture.

Once you’ve decided to grow your business internationally, but before you get too set on the distribution channel strategy you’ve selected, it’s time to consider your staffing requirements.

The Hiring and Distribution Connection

The distribution channel you choose is going to have an impact on the kind of hiring decisions you have to make. You should consider the employment implications when you are choosing your distribution channel strategy.

If you are responsible for locating, vetting, and hiring new employees then there are a variety of costs; recruitment and interviewing, legal obligations, wages, taxes, benefits – and the layers of assistance you may need to navigate these systems.

In fact, the costs involved may start to impact the economic viability of your chosen distribution strategy. (Sigh, just when you thought the hard decisions were done with!)

However, if you elect to use agents it’s not as simple as just partnering with existing people on the ground. Dependent on the terms of your Agent partnership or Joint Venture you may still need to be involved with the hiring of employees – certainly you will need to identify what skills are required to do the job.

One way to cover all your bases is to consider providing training for any intermediaries you are using; agencies, distributors, retailers and wholesalers may all benefit from any training or support you can give frontline staff closing sales and/or managing customer service.

Skilled vs. Unskilled

skilledvsunskilled

One of the biggest challenges when it comes to staffing your overseas venture is the skill requirement.  This may be problematic because the definition of skilled vs. unskilled may vary from one country to the next.

The skills you expect unskilled labourers to have in Britain – often to high-school level and even high school diploma – are different than the skills you should expect from less developed nations. And unfortunately research shows that while the need for highly skilled labour is increasing globally, there is simply an increasing gap between the necessary jobs skills and the skills workers actually have.

For example the gap between jobs requiring workers with digital skills, and the available workers with digital skills, is widening. The digital skills gap is going to be even wider in a region where education levels and access to technology is lower.

You should never mistake figuring low-cost local labour into your business plans without understanding that sometimes this comes at a higher cost overall.

The best way to get to grips with this is:

–          Work directly with the current UK employees who hold the positions you wish to fill in other countries: What is their skill level? Can their role be broken down into a checklist and anyone trained in that role? Even if they are not literate enough to read detailed process manuals? If not, what parts of the job could be automated or will require a specific skill set?

–          Plan to provide detailed training for all new employees: This avoids the mistake of ‘presuming knowledge’ that new hires should have in an unfamiliar market.

–          Hire skilled workers as consultants instead of regular employees: If you do require skilled workers consider this solution as a cost-effective bridge between hiring skilled workers full-time. It can also assist in raising the overall skill level of your local team.

–          Consider short or long term staff transfers: One of the best ways to get your new staff up and running might be to provide someone from your UK operation locally. Many mid-level staff members, particularly those without family commitments, may be keen to develop their career in a new office and see it as an adventure to live and work overseas while maintaining the same job. Although expensive and time-consuming to get local work visas and pay relocation cost this could avoid a more costly staffing problem in the long term.

Complications in Labour Relations

Encountering cultural confusion with your customers isn’t your only worry when it comes to working overseas. You will also encounter cultural, legal, and etiquette differences in each of the different countries. As always, these differences have can a financial impact on your cost of doing business.

Even among countries where you don’t foresee differences – such as within Europe or in overseas countries where English is also spoken as a first language – some of the differences in the ways that people work can be subtle but impactful.

For example, in France most people say that it is against the law to eat lunch at your desk. Whether this is true or anecdotal [we couldn’t find anything official on this – does anyone know for sure?] staff certainly have an expectation at lunch that they will be allowed to leave for at least an hour (in some cases up to two hours) and the company should provide a place to eat lunch if they want to bring food from home or a takeaway.

A simple solution, if hiring staff, is to always work with a local agency to help you navigate cultural and legal pitfalls (remember even individual country laws on what sort of questions you can ask in interviews will vary).

Working hours, leave, and even lunch times are all dictated by law and can be navigated. But there is one cultural difference that may not exist officially but could make or break your business; corruption.

bribery

In some cultures ‘bribes’ are considered a normal cost of doing business. Even if you are working through third-parties, you are you are potentially liable for the corrupt actions they take on behalf of your business. (Under the Bribery Act, for example, you may be held legally liable for bribes paid by or through a third party).

So, you need to keep a careful watch in all your overseas business, but especially in cultures where bribes are considered a normal cost of doing business.

Overall, this emphasizes the importance of due diligence on your part, regardless of how you obtain workers for your venture. Remember, your business reputation is on the line even if you never meet your employees or your consultants, so take care to ensure the workers you hire to staff your overseas venture are people you can trust with your reputation.

You can read part two here.

Support an award-winning interior designer. Weekly Lending Review: week 40

Week 40: 30 September – 6 October 2013

Last week, the majority of businesses looking for loans were located in London and the South-East and the most common loan purpose was working capital. New businesses include a Lancashire book retailer and an award-winning London-based interior designer.

New loans

There were 49 new business loans listed last week and there are currently 25 auctions on the marketplace.

The total value of the new listed loans was £3,118,540; that’s an average of £63,644 per loan. The largest loan value was £250,000 and the smallest loan value was £10,000.

Business loans still available for bidding on for the next 3 days or more:

Weekly marketplace trends

These graphs show the most recent activity on the marketplace. The average gross yield graph is reported weekly and shows a rolling two week average. Number of loans, value of loans and secondary market are reported weekly. The dates on the graph should be read as ‘week beginning’, for example: 30-Sep represents the week of 30th September – 6th October.

Weekly average gross yield (2 weeks rolling)

yield

Number of listed loans per week

number

Listed loan value per week

value

News you should know

In August, we invited you to ask Ed Wray, one of the UK’s leading entrepreneurs, any business related questions had. We’ve compiled a list of the best questions & answers from Ed which you can have a read of on our blog.

A small proportion of businesses who borrow through the marketplace will have difficulties paying back their loans so it’s important to understand what this means for both the investors and the business involved. With that in mind, we’ve written a summary of key terms and processes involved in the recoveries process.

Have you seen the new Funding Circle blog?  Be sure to subscribe to it with your email address to get regular updates: https://www.fundingcircle.com/blog/.

Loans defaulted last week

No loans were defaulted.

Enjoy lending, The Funding Circle Team